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Is it Illegal to Give Someone Adderall?

Can You Get in Trouble for Taking Adderall?

Adderall is an addictive prescription stimulant that produces similar effects to meth. When abused, Adderall can cause a person to depend on the drug to make them feel more alert and productive. Studies reveal that 18 to 25-year-olds tend to misuse Adderall at the highest rates. These individuals often get the medication from friends or family members without a prescription.

According to the 2018 Monitoring the Future College Students and Young Adults survey, 11.1% of college students reported misusing Adderall while 8.1% of non-college students reported such. “Misuse” in this context means someone is:

  • Taking someone else’s prescription
  • Using a higher dose than prescribed
  • Injecting, snorting, or smoking Adderall
  • Mixing the pills with other drugs or alcohol
  • Using Adderall to get high or to keep up with school studies

Adderall Side Effects

Many young people try Adderall because of curiosity, peer pressure, and stress. Others misuse Adderall because of its reported “desirable” effects, which allegedly include:

  • Improves concentration and focus
  • Helps students stay awake
  • Improves sociability and talkativeness
  • Weight loss
  • Peer pressure
  • Reduces stress

These reasons do not justify the act. Even if “everyone’s doing it,” that doesn’t mean misusing Adderall is necessarily okay. As you can see from above, Adderall’s side effects are not that desirable. While it may seem beneficial at first, the bottom line is the negatives outweigh the positives. Even if your friends are misusing Adderall and they seem fine, you could experience some detrimental side effects of non-prescribed Adderall, which include:

  • Restlessness
  • Nervousness
  • Anxiety
  • Dry mouth
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Talkativeness
  • Headache
  • Difficulty falling asleep

If that doesn’t sound bad enough, the side effects can worsen in some people and create severe reactions, including:

  • Seizures
  • Paranoia
  • Swelling
  • Shortness of breath
  • Blurred vision
  • Chest pains
  • Slow or difficult speech
  • Hallucinating
  • Aggressive behavior

Punishment for Selling Adderall

It is illegal to sell or use Adderall without a prescription. Adderall is a Schedule II drug, meaning it’s grouped with dangerous drugs like cocaine. Schedule II drugs have a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence.

The punishment for possessing a Schedule II prescription drug without a prescription is usually a third-degree felony crime punishable by up to 5 years in prison and up to $5,000 fines. But if the prosecution proves that you intended to sell or distribute Adderall illegally, you may get charged with a second-degree felony or first-degree felony.

If you’re convicted of a second-degree felony in Florida, you could face up to 15 years in prison and/or $10,000 fines. A first-degree felony conviction carries a 30-year prison sentence and a maximum of $10,000 fines.

As you can see, it’s best to think twice before giving someone Adderall or using it without a prescription. Only a licensed primary care physician, psychiatrist, or neurologist can prescribe Adderall to someone. Not you.

If you are facing drug crime charges for illegally selling Adderall, give our firm a call at (407) 708-9127 to learn about your options.

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